Employee breach of good faith and loyalty

Appellate Division Second Department case law is clear that “an employee owes a duty of good faith and loyalty to an employer in the performance of the employee’s duties.” Is. Sports Physical Therapy v. Burns, 84 AD3d 878, 878 [2d Dept 2011].

While there is duty of good faith and loyalty owed to an employer, “an employee may create a competing business prior to leaving her or his employer without breaching any fiduciary duty unless she or he makes improper use of the employer’s time, facilities or proprietary secrets in doing so.” Is. Sports Physical Therapy v. Burns, 84 AD3d 878, 878 (2d Dept 2011) (citing Schneider Leasing Plus v. Stallone, 172 A.D.2d 739, 741, 569 N.Y.S.2d 126).

A common example of a breach of a duty of good faith and loyalty is when an employee solicits his or her employer’s customers or otherwise compete during the course of his or her employment with the employer by the use of the employer’s time, facilities or proprietary information. 30 FPS Productions, Inc. v. Livolsi, 68 AD3d 1101, 1102 [2d Dept 2009]; A & L Scientific Corp. v. Latmore, 265 AD2d 355, 355 [2d Dept 1999}; Schneider Leasing Plus, Inc. v. Stallone, 172 AD2d 739 [2d Dept 1991].

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